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New Underground Rome

May 14, 2018

I got a chance to check out the new metro station just before it opened to the public on Saturday. Absolutely spectacular! The finds on display tell the story of Rome through stratigraphy (graphically marked with a clear indication of level below modern ground), chronology (with key dates popping up as you descend) and themes (color coding of themes dear to Sustainable Rome readers: water, reuse, etc.). The lighting is good, the signage is graphically excellent.

Sure, in the name of simplicity not much information is provided (a display case filled with marble fragments has one little placard saying essentially “old stuff”) and labels are only in Italian(well, it’s not like foreign tourists come to Rome or anything!). But the well-produced informative videos are subtitled in English and much of the display is self-explanatory.

It will be years before this station connects to anything but the outlying eastern periphery so I am curious to know how travelers will experience the station. People coming to see San Giovanni may arrive on the A line, then take a walk through the new station (which requires going out the turnstyle and then in again at Metro C but the ticket should still be valid I was told). Or perhaps this station will bring greater attention to the up and coming outer neighborhoods like Centocelle where my foodie friends keep unearthing new gastronomic treasures, including Santo Palato a short walk from the new station itself.

My principal fear is that lack of maintenance and security issues will result in a rapid decline in the station. I saw it during the press opening but had to leave before the crowds arrived. Knowing what other new stations look like –Conca D’Oro on the B line is already covered in graffiti a couple of years after its inauguration –I can only imagine what this now immaculate museum station may become if we are not all vigilant.

Very Roman scene at the turnstyle.

press conference rush hour

descending into the station

coins

displays include interesting metalwork and jewelry

irrigation pipes from an ancient orchard

organic finds such as peach pits encased in resin.

the use of glass for finds, photos and data is very successful

glass cases with finds and supergraphic titles

stratigraphic legend

chronological graphic display

the approach to street level

a view of the “museum” upon entry

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